Today Jews Observe “Yom Kippur” – The Holiest Day on the Jewish Calendar 1


Yom Kippur (Hebrew: יוֹם כִּפּוּר‎‎, IPA: [ˈjom kiˈpuʁ], or יום הכיפורים), also known as Day of Atonement, is the holiest day of the year for the Jewish people. Its central themes are atonement and repentance. Jews traditionally observe this holy day with a 25-hour period of fasting and intensive prayer, often spending most of the day in synagogue services. Yom Kippur completes the annual period known in Judaism as the High Holy Days or Yamim Nora’im (“Days of Awe”).

Yom Kippur is the tenth day of the month of Tishrei. According to Jewish traditionGod inscribes each person’s fate for the coming year into a book, the Book of Life, on Rosh Hashanah, and waits until Yom Kippur to “seal” the verdict. During the Days of Awe, a Jew tries to amend his or her behavior and seek forgiveness for wrongs done against God (bein adam leMakom) and against other human beings (bein adam lechavero). The evening and day of Yom Kippur are set aside for public and private petitions and confessions of guilt (Vidui). At the end of Yom Kippur, one considers oneself absolved by God.

The Yom Kippur prayer service includes several unique aspects. One is the actual number of prayer services. Unlike a regular day, which has three prayer services (Ma’ariv, the evening prayer; Shacharit, the morning prayer; and Mincha, the afternoon prayer), or a Shabbat or Yom Tov, which have four prayer services (Ma’arivShacharitMussaf, the additional prayer; and Mincha), Yom Kippur has five prayer services (Ma’arivShacharitMusafMincha; and Ne’ilah, the closing prayer). The prayer services also include private and public confessions of sins (Vidui) and a unique prayer dedicated to the special Yom Kippur avodah (service) of the Kohen Gadol in the Holy Temple in Jerusalem.

As one of the most culturally significant Jewish holidays, Yom Kippur is observed by many secular Jews who may not observe other holidays. Many secular Jews attend synagogue on Yom Kippur—for many secular Jews the High Holy Days are the only recurring times of the year in which they attend synagogue[1]—causing synagogue attendance to soar. [Wikipedia]

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Barack Obama to warn Iran in UN general assembly speech


GUARDIAN UK

  • Reuters in New York
  • guardian.co.uk, Tuesday 25 September 2012 07.22 EDT

Barack Obama will use his annual UN address on Tuesday to warn Iran against developing a nuclear deterrent. Photograph: Carolyn Kaster/AP

Barack Obama will warn Iran that the US will “do what we must” to prevent it acquiring a nuclear weapon, and appeal to world leaders for a united front against further attacks on US diplomatic missions in Muslim countries.

Preparing to take the podium on Tuesday at the UN six weeks before the US presidential election, Obama hopes to counter criticism of his foreign policy record by Republican rival Mitt Romney, who has accused him of mishandling the Arab uprisings, damaging ties with Israel and not being tough enough on Iran.

Seeking to step up pressure on Iran, Obama will tell the UN general assembly there is still time for diplomacy but that “time is not unlimited”.

His tough talk appears aimed at easing Israeli concerns about US resolve to curb Tehran’s nuclear drive, as he reasserts before the world body that he will never let Iran develop an atomic bomb and then simply contain the problem.

But he will stop short of meeting demands by the Israeli prime minister Binyamin Netanyahu to set a clear “red line” that Iran must not cross if it is to avoid military action.   FULL ARTICLE