“Delaying retirement can delay dementia, large study finds”


NBC NEWS/AP

By Marilynn Marchione, The Associated Press
Alex Brandon / AP June Springer, who just turned 90, at Caffi Contracting Services where she works in Alexandria, Va.
Alex Brandon / AP
June Springer, who just turned 90, at Caffi Contracting Services where she works in Alexandria, Va.

New research boosts the “use it or lose it” theory about brainpower and staying mentally sharp. People who delay retirement have less risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease or other types of dementia, a study of nearly half a million people in France found.

It’s by far the largest study to look at this, and researchers say the conclusion makes sense. Working tends to keep people physically active, socially connected and mentally challenged — all things known to help prevent mental decline.

“For each additional year of work, the risk of getting dementia is reduced by 3.2 percent,” said Carole Dufouil, a scientist at INSERM, the French government‘s health research agency.

She led the study and gave results Monday at the Alzheimer’s Association International Conference in Boston.

About 35 million people worldwide have dementia, and Alzheimer’s is the most common type. In the U.S., about 5 million have Alzheimer’s — 1 in 9 people aged 65 and over. What causes the mind-robbing disease isn’t known and there is no cure or any treatments that slow its progression.

FULL  ARTICLE

Continue reading ““Delaying retirement can delay dementia, large study finds””

Mitch McConnell: Political Jekyll and Hyde


Good Mitch McConnell

`

Bad Mitch McConnell

`

Continue reading “Mitch McConnell: Political Jekyll and Hyde”

“At Long Last, Dignity?”


Frank Bruni in an Earl Wilson photo

If you live for 80 years, Chuck Bennett told me, you see things you never imagined. Crazy, fantastical stuff.

A man on the moon. “Amazing,” he said.

The Soviet Union’s disintegration. “Also amazing.”

And on Nov. 6, if the polls are right and his hope is fulfilled, the people of Maine may pass a referendum for same-sex marriage, which no state has adopted by popular vote before.

“That’s equally amazing to me,” he said. Ten minutes later, he circled back to say it again. “I would like to reiterate how amazing it is.”

Bennett was born in 1932 and grew up in Brooklyn without anything but slurs and clinical terms to describe his attraction to other men. In the late 1950s, he was forced out of the Navy for being gay.

He never found a long-term romantic partner, thwarted in part by a disapproving society with no obvious role models for him, and he bought his dream house on the ocean here 15 years ago with two close friends, because he didn’t want to grow old alone and didn’t expect to meet anyone special, not so late in the game. MORE

Continue reading ““At Long Last, Dignity?””