“The Quiet Death Of Long-Term Unemployment Insurance In 2013”


THE HUFFINGTON POST

By Sam Stein and Arthur Delaney

WASHINGTON — The looming expiration of federal unemployment benefits raises the question of whether Democratic lawmakers bungled the debate.

Though Congress can still act retroactively, Democrats‘ goal had been to pass an extension of the benefits before Dec. 28, when they are set to expire. The administration and allies on the Hill tried to attach a provision to the budget deal passed in mid-December. But by the time they began engaging the fight, few Democrats seemed particularly attentive and Republicans were more than comfortable running out the clock.

Now, with Congress in recess, long-term unemployment insurance will come to an end for 1.3 million Americans, potentially costing 240,000 jobs, according to the White House‘s Council of Economic Advisers. Was it inevitable? Or was it a case of political mismanagement?

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NEWS FROM THE HILL – BACKGROUND CHECKS


THE  HILL

News from The Hill:

Senate rejects tougher background checks on gun purchases 
By Alexander Bolton

The Senate delivered a devastating blow to President Obama’s agenda to regulate guns Wednesday by defeating a bipartisan proposal to expand background checks.

It failed by a vote of 54 to 46, with 5 Democrats voting against it. Only 4 Republicans supported it.

Read the story here.


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NEWS: FISCAL CLIFF


THE HILL

News from The Hill:

Boehner, House GOP reject debt deal offer from White House 
By Russell Berman, Mike Lillis and Erik Wasson

Speaker John Boehner (R-Ohio) on Thursday rejected a White House offer to avert the fiscal cliff that would include $1.6 trillion in tax increases, $400 billion in spending cuts and a permanent increase in the debt ceiling, Republican aides said.

Aides said the offer was made by Treasury Secretary Tim Geithner and Rob Nabors, a top White House adviser, during their meeting with Republican leaders in the Capitol.

While the Obama administration described the offer as reducing the deficit by $4 trillion over 10 years, Republican told The Hill its tax increases amount to $600 billion more than what the Democratic-led Senate passed earlier this year when it approved legislation that would allow tax rates on top earners to rise.

Read the story here.