“How the loss of net neutrality could change the internet”


POLITICO

“The repeal of net neutrality ushers in a new chapter of the internet that could eventually transform the way Americans communicate, shop and consume information online.

The Federal Communications Commission’s party-line vote Thursday to dump the Obama-era rules, which required internet service providers to treat all web traffic equally, opens the door for companies like Verizon and AT&T to experiment with new business models free from government regulation.” MORE

“Net Neutrality II: Last Week Tonight with John Oliver (HBO)”


HBO

“Al Franken Explodes And Rips FCC Chairman’s Plan To End Net Neutrality”


POLITICUS USA

After FCC Chairman Ajit Pai said in a speech that he wants to reverse net neutrality rules and end open and free Internet, Sen. Al Franken (D-MN) went off and vowed to fight the Chairman’s proposal to destroy the Internet.

“Net neutrality just went to court. Here’s how it did.”


WASHINGTON POST

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“Gauntlet awaits Internet rules”


THE HILL

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“Historic vote set for Internet rules”


THE HILL

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“F.C.C. Net Neutrality Rules Clear Hurdle as Republicans Concede to Obama”


NEW YORK TIMES

Senator John Thune, Republican of South Dakota, said that Democrats were lining up with President Obama in favor of the F.C.C. position on net neutrality. Credit Jabin Botsford/The New York Times

Senator John Thune, Republican of South Dakota, said that Democrats were lining up with President Obama in favor of the F.C.C. position on net neutrality. Credit Jabin Botsford/The New York Times

“Let’s get real — We aren’t talking about net neutrality”


Old Man Using Computer with Slow Connection

THE HILL

There are many problems with the public conversation surrounding the Federal Communications Commission’s (FCC) net neutrality rule-making: The public discourse struggles to rise above simple catch-phrases, popular antipathy against broadband providers clouds good decision-making and the increasing politicization of tech issues drives policy-by-ideology over rigorous analysis of available trade-offs. But one problem stands out among the rest — we aren’t actually arguing about net neutrality. Instead of fiddling with a variety of jurisdictional hooks, none of which are quite right for the job, the FCC should take a step back and allow this problem to be solved the right way — through legislation.

FULL ARTICLE

President Obama gives his position on protecting the Internet . . .